How%20Do%20Crises%20Affect%20Schooling%20Decisions%3F%20Evidence%20from%20Changing%20Labor%20Market%20Opportunities%20and%20a%20Policy%20Experiment

Working Papers

How Do Crises Affect Schooling Decisions? Evidence from Changing Labor Market Opportunities and a Policy Experiment


CODE: WP-653
AUTHOR(s): Lopez Boo, Florencia
PUBLISHED: December 2008
LANGUAGE: English
RELATED TOPICS: Poverty Reduction and Labor
DOWNLOAD FILE IN: English

Abstract:

This paper examines the effect of labor market opportunities on schooling and employment decisions in 12 urban areas in Argentina over 12 years, emphasizing the recession/crisis years of 1998-2002. In “typical” years deteriorating job rates boost the probability of attending school and decrease the probability of combining work and school, particularly for boys; the probability of being in school for secondary school children was about 6% higher in 2002 than in 1998. These estimates reflect a new 1996 Federal Education Law (FEL) that extended mandatory education to 10 years.

Related Research by JEL Codes:
(or click here to find research by JEL Codes)
  • Learning Better: Public Policy for Skills Development
    Books
    IDB-BK-171 - August 2017

    Despite governments’ best efforts, many people in Latin America and the Caribbean don’t have the skills they need to thrive. This book looks at what policies work, and don’t work, so that governments can help people learn better and realize their potential throughout their lifetimes. (View publication)

  • Learning Better: Public Policy for Skills Development (Executive Summary)
    Brochures
    IDB-BR-184 - August 2012

    Despite governments’ best efforts, many people in Latin America and the Caribbean don’t have the skills they need to thrive. This book looks at what policies work, and don’t work, so that governments can help people learn better and realize their potential throughout their lifetimes. (View publication)

  • Motivation, Resources and the Organization of the School System
    Working Papers
    IDB-WP-708 - July 2016

    This paper studies a model where student effort and talent interact with parental and teachers’ investments, as well as with school system resources. The model is rich, yet sufficiently stylized to provide novel implications. It can show, for example, that an improvement in parental outside options will reduce parental and school effort, which are partially compensated through school resources ... (View publication)

Hello, Welcome to the IDB!

Please join our mailing list by simply entering your email below.