Household%20Education%20Spending%20in%20Latin%20America%20and%20the%20Caribbean%3A%20Evidence%20from%20Income%20and%20Expenditure%20Surveys

Working Papers

Household Education Spending in Latin America and the Caribbean: Evidence from Income and Expenditure Surveys


CODE: IDB-WP-773
AUTHOR(s): Acerenza, Santiago , Gandelman, Nestor
PUBLISHED: March 2017
LANGUAGE: English
RELATED TOPICS: Poverty Reduction and Labor
DOWNLOAD FILE IN: English

Abstract:

This paper characterizes household spending in education using microdata from income and expenditure surveys for 12 Latin American and Caribbean countries and the United States. Bahamas, Chile and Mexico have the highest household spending in education while Bolivia, Brazil and Paraguay have the lowest. Tertiary education is the most important form of spending, and most educational spending is performed for individuals 18-23 years old. More educated and richer household heads spend more in the education of household members. Households with both parents present and those with a female main income provider spend more than their counterparts. Urban households also spend more than rural households. On average, education in Latin America and the Caribbean is a luxury good, while it may be a necessity in the United States. No gender bias is found in primary education, but households invest more in females of secondary age and up than same-age males.

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