Does%20Technology%20in%20Schools%20Affect%20Repetition%2C%20Dropout%20and%20Enrollment%3F%20Evidence%20from%20Peru

Working Papers

Does Technology in Schools Affect Repetition, Dropout and Enrollment? Evidence from Peru


CODE: IDB-WP-477
AUTHOR(s): Cristia, Julian , Czerwonko, Alejo , Garofalo, Pablo
PUBLISHED: January 2014
LANGUAGE: English
RELATED TOPICS: Finance
DOWNLOAD FILE IN: English

Abstract:

Many developing countries are allocating significant resources to expanding technology access in schools. Whether these investments will translate into measurable educational improvements remains an open question because of the limited evidence available. This paper contributes to filling that gap by exploiting a large-scale public program that increased computer and Internet access in secondary public schools in Peru. Rich longitudinal school-level data from 2001 to 2006 are used to implement a differences-in-differences framework. Results indicate no statistically significant effects of increasing technology access in schools on repetition, dropout and initial enrollment. Large sample sizes allow ruling out even modest effects.

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