Online%20Appendix%20for%20Paper%20Entitled%0D%0A%E2%80%9CDemocracy%20Does%20Not%20Cause%0D%0AGrowth%3A%20The%20Importance%20of%0D%0AEndogeneity%20Arguments%E2%80%9D

Technical Notes

Online Appendix for Paper Entitled “Democracy Does Not Cause Growth: The Importance of Endogeneity Arguments”


CODE: IDB-TN-1064
AUTHOR(s): Ruiz Pozuelo, Julia , Slipowitz, Amy , Vuletin, Guillermo
PUBLISHED: June 2016
LANGUAGE: English
RELATED TOPICS: Macroeconomics
DOWNLOAD FILE IN: English

Abstract:

This online appendix presents a thorough analysis of the nature, dynamics, and most important events for 38 cases of democratization, including the list of democracy experts and key country-specific references obtained from the survey and from numerous books and academic articles.

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